The Compiling of the book `Evangelism'

Posted Nov 13, 2011 by kym Jones in Adventist History Hits: 5,488

 

The following extract is from a manuscript entitled `The God of our Fathers', by Kelvin D. Cobbin,  pp. 116, 117.

 

 

The Compiling of the book Evangelism

 

In order to sustain and give credence to the newly adopted trinitarian concepts being promoted by a few influential persons within the denomination, a compilation of Ellen G. White’s was written which would apparently endorse the new trinitarian position which was now gaining traction. The compilation entitled “Evangelism” (1946) neatly fills this purpose. In the book “Evangelism,” are compiled quotations which give the trinity doctrine just such an apparent prophetic credence. In 1966 Leroy Froom wrote a letter to R.A. Anderson bragging how they both had a part in compiling the E.G. White quotations in “Evangelism” in order to combat the Columbian Union Conference leaders who were still non-trinitarian at the time (1946). Dr Froom stated, “You know what it did with men in the Columbia Union… They either had to lay down their arms, and accept those statements, or else they had to reject the Spirit of Prophecy.” [Letter from Leroy Froom to Roy Allen Anderson. Jan 18 1966].

As can be seen from this letter Elder Froom seemed to have an objective to convince the church membership that Sister White was an ally to his work. It is clear from the book “Evangelism” that the statements chosen to support Dr Froom’s trinity theories are openly man’s devising. Dr Froom has gone to the lengths of using the word “trinity” (Evangelism page 616) in a heading when Mrs White never uses the term. It is clear that the church until after the death of Sister White, did not adhere to a trinity doctrine. This is plain when you read the fundamental beliefs of the church up until 1931. The 1931 statement in the Yearbook although the word trinity is used the essence of the the statement was the same as the 1872 statement and was distinctly non trinitarian n in its concept. It seems like the  statement below slipped through without notice as it “undoes” Dr Froom’s argument.

 

Note this statement from “Evangelism”

Let People Know Our Position – “Our policy is, Do not make prominent the objectionable features of our faith, which strike most decidedly against the practises and customs of the people, until the Lord shall give the people a fair chance to know that we are believers in Christ, that we do believe in the divinity of Christ, and in His pre-existence. {Evangelism p 613 – 1895} 

Remember that these statements were intended to convince some of our church leaders in 1946 that Sister White supports the doctrine of the trinity – Letter from Dr Leroy Froom to R.A. Anderson 1966

 

Let People Know Our Position – (my comments in brackets) “Our policy is, Do not make prominent the objectionable features of our faith (Mrs White makes it plain that she is speaking about our position on the “divinity of Christ” for she explains this in the latter part of the statement), which strike most decidedly against the practises and customs of the people (why does this strike against the customs and practises of the people? – Because the people of the Christian world almost unanimously believe in the doctrine of the trinity. This would upset them as they believe that Christ was as the Father a being of the Godhead that had eternity of past existence) until the Lord shall give the people a fair chance to know that we are believers in Christ, that we do believe in the divinity of Christ (why would the people not believe that the Seventh-Day Adventist Church believed in the divinity of Christ? - because we did not believe or accept the “customs of the people” who believe the trinity, and therefore this, to them, equals not believing in the divinity of Christ) and in His pre-existence.” {Evangelism p 613 – 1895}

 

Comments on the above statement

The fact is our Seventh-Day Adventist Church has always believed in the divinity of Christ and in His pre-existence – though we never accepted the “customs and practises” of the people as Sister White describes which obviously, in this context, is the doctrine of the trinity.' (`The God of our Fathers', PDF document, pp. 116, 117.) 

Ellen White wrote this statement at a time when the `objectionable features of our faith' pertained to Trinitarians of her day which were not Adventists. However, it would seem that the wheels have now turned to the point that the `omega' now runs so deeply within our own ranks, that effectively this statement now applies just as much to our own brethren, as it did to non-Adventists when Ellen White was alive. I reproduce it once more for the reader to peruse, this time with our own Trinitarian brethren in mind, for this counsel now applies as much to how we relate to our own people, as it did to how Seventh-Day Adventists related to other denominations and people in general, when Ellen White was alive: 

`Do not make prominent the objectionable features of our faith, which strike most decidedly against the practises and customs of the people, until the Lord shall give the people a fair chance to know that we are believers in Christ, that we do believe in the divinity of Christ, and in His pre-existence.'

If anyone wishes to castigate me over this position, please send me an e-mail privately, and I will respond in kind. Adrian has my e-mail address.