Risk of Eternal Loss

Part of series Father and Son

A beautiful sermon showing how the relationship between Adam and Eve was a reflection of the relationship of the Father and the Son and how in giving His son the Father was willing to risk eternal loss.

It reflects accurately my understanding of the Father and the Son.

At 22:42 Pr Bohr says:

Now we have all read that text in Genesis where it speaks about the image of God. Genesis 1:26 says Then God, (Ellen White identifies this person as the Father) The God said, (she says He was speaking to His Son Jesus Christ.) Then God said, let us make man, how? In our image according to our likeness. Now we usually think of the image of God as an individual thing. Adam was made in the image of God, physically, mentally and spiritually. Eve was made in the image of God, physically mentally and spiritually. We think of the image of God as an individual thing. But really what Genesis 1:26 is explaining is that the relationship between Adam and Eve was to reflect the relationship between the Father and the Son. It was an exhibition on a smaller scale of the relationship between the Father and the Son.

Return of Elijah page 216:

So Genesis 1:27 tells us that man was made in God’s image in the singular (character, body type and thinking ability) as well as the image of both Father and Son. So Adam and Eve as a unit were made in the image of the Father and the Son. Notice carefully that the relationship between Adam and Eve was also part of what is the image of God. So not only were Adam and Eve made in the image of God individually, their relationship was also a reflection, resemblance of the relationship between the Father and the Son. This being the case then indeed the relationship between Adam and Eve gives us a key to understanding the relationship between the Father and the Son.

Download Return of Elijah http://maranathamedia.com/resources/maranathamedia/collections/adrian-ebens-3/return-of-elijah/1514-the-return-of-elijah/file

Presented: Jan 03, 2015
Presenter: Stephen Bohr